Building Bike Lanes Slows Climate Change

Two-way parking protected bike lane in Montreal. Photo by Karen and MomentumMag
Two-way parking protected bike lane in Montreal. Photo by Karen and MomentumMag

The causal linkage of cycling infrastructure with increased cycling modal share has been well researched and proven in several case studies.  That linkage has now been extended to quantify the long-assumed reduction in GHG emissions that contribute to climate change.  The Canadian-based research examined over ten years of data from Montreal, reaffirmed the positive link between cycling infrastructure and modal share uptake, and went on to quantify the GHG reductions resulting from modal switch from autos to bikes. Bottom line? Building bike infrastructure results in cycling uptake and a quantifiable reduction in motorized modal share, contributing (among other things) to slowing climate change.  Read more here.

Author: Alan Medcalf

Alan is a post-corporate, volunteer, community builder living in Brockville, Ontario. He seeks to create sustainable lifestyle advantage for the community by creating opportunities for more people to choose to walk and to ride bikes. He promotes the health, social, environmental and economic benefits of active mobility.