In Collingwood – Keep Calm And Pedal On

If everyone stays calm and follows the rules of the road, we can all get home safely.

Peddling Cycle Safety in Collingwood
“More and more cyclists are riding on Ontario’s roads. As the population grows in cottage communities such as Collingwood, so has the sport. But its popularity has caused some tension and confusion for others on the road – including local police. Ontario Hubs field producer Jeyan Jeganathan gets to the root of the problem.”
See the TVO video coverage here.

Of note, Collingwood has also adopted a paved shoulders policy to help make regional roads safer for everybody (and to save taxpayers money as well).

Side note: For those not aware of how cycling groups ride defensively, including riding two abreast, check out the Ottawa Bicycle Club’s educational pieces, some of the best around for well over a decade,
here and here.

Discover L & A Ride

Gather some friends, hop on your bikes and enjoy the “2018 Discover L & A Ride” on Saturday, September 22. The 58 km route begins and ends at MacKinnon Brothers Brewing Company in the village of Bath. The picturesque route leads you along quiet paved roads that overlook the water’s edge and authentic Eastern Ontario landscapes.

You’ll hear live music, tour historic sites, sample local wine and cider, and enjoy an ice-cold glass of craft beer at the end of the ride. It’s going to be an unforgettable day of cycling in Lennox & Addington!  Register now at the event website here.

The County of Lennox & Addington was the first county in Eastern Ontario to adopt a pave shoulders policy for all county roads over a decade ago. The objective was safer roads for all, development of the cycle tourism sector to draw visitors north from the Great Lakes Waterfront Trail, and to save taxpayers money through road maintenance operational savings. Success on all counts!

For more information on cycling routes in L & A County, visit their website here.

New Great Lakes Waterfront Trail Website

From the June edition of the
Ontario By Bike newsletter:

The Great Lakes Waterfront Trail and signature cycling route in Ontario continues to grow and is now over 2,100km long. Chances are you are already familiar with and have ridden parts of this signed route that touches 140 communities and skirts 3 Great Lakes.

To better help you navigate the trail, a new website has recently been launched with a number of useful features that can help you plan a day trip, overnight tour or end-to-end adventure.

  • Highly detailed and free to download maps
  • Interactive online trail map
  • Suggested ride itineraries
  • Community information

Make use of these features and start planning your ride today on the Great Lakes Waterfront Trail. www.WaterfrontTrail.org

Great Lakes Waterfront Trail Keeps Growing

The Lake Huron North Channel extension of the Great Lakes Waterfront Trail network is ready for you to explore!

Stretching 380 km from Sudbury to Sault Ste. Marie, the trail travels along quiet back roads and paths as it traverses some of the most spectacular landscapes in Ontario, serving up rocky shorelines, picturesque Mennonite and Amish farmsteads, rushing waterfalls, gently flowing rivers, sandy beaches, and thick forests. Twenty-six communities and First Nations dot its length, offering opportunities to stop, rest, and explore. Stay the night in a lakeside cottage, partake in some locally caught smoked fish, or enjoy a refreshing end-of-the-day local brew.

Read more here.

Spring Is Summit Season

It’s Spring, and with Spring comes the annual round of Bike Summits to rejuvenate and re-stoke our interest in working for public roads that better serve the needs of the general public.

All of the summits draw elected representatives, professionals, advocates and other interested parties from public works, transportation, planning, consulting, economic development, education, tourism, recreation and other disciplines together.

Here’s a quick guide with links to pages where you can learn more:
– The 10th Annual Ontario Bike Summit will be held in Toronto April 16-18.
– The National Bike Summit will be held in Ottawa May 28-29.
– The 5th Annual Eastern Ontario Active Transportation Summit will be held this year right here in Brockville, at the Memorial Centre, May 10-11.

Save The Date: Brockville, May 10-11: 5th Annual Eastern Ontario Active Transportation Summit

Save the date: May 10 – 11. The 5th Annual Eastern Ontario Active Transportation Summit will be held in Brockville on these dates.

Thursday, May 10 will feature presentations, panelists and discussions revolving around how to create plans and projects and how to move them forward. This is of heightened interest this year, the first year of four for the Ontario Municipal Commuter Cycling Program in which many municipalities and townships throughout Eastern Ontario are receiving significant funding to help make our public roads more usable for all.

Tentatively, Friday, May 11 will be a morning session focused on cycle tourism – how our region can better gain from this fast-growing sector of the tourism economy.

For information on past year’s Summits, and to see the agenda for this year as it firms up, please see: http://healthyllg.org/active_transportation.html

Ottawa Valley Boosting Cycle Tourism

The Ottawa Valley region is one among many in Ontario tapping into the successful and growing cycle tourism sector. Their latest investment is route maps: “The cycling map can be used as a tool to draw cyclists from outside of the region to the area, which will support tourism in the area.”

Ask your favourite local/regional councilor why we’re not actively chasing this proven opportunity.

Read more here.

Cycle Tourism In Small Towns And Rural Areas

Sometimes the relentless flood of evidence in research and case studies, all showing the overwhelming positive bottom line and growth of cycle tourism is, well, overwhelming. It can seem cold and analytic, which it needs to be.
Yet local stories inspire and provide context, which is also important, especially in small towns and conservative rural areas.
“Bicycle tourism has an unexpected and humble ability to prop up small economies. And it is those small-but-lasting impacts that we want communities to expect and believe in, and then build from.”

Read more here.