How To Launch Your Active Mobility Lifestyle

“The evidence for why we should actively transport ourselves in the city is mounting, but there are some technicalities to work out. You want to get yourself around under your own steam, but where do you start? It can seem a bit daunting to change habits and possibly routes. Thankfully, we live in an era with lots of tools at our fingertips that can help us out.” And with that, a blogger from Calgary explains how she adopted more active ways of getting around the city with her kids and integrated that activity into everyday life. Read more here.

For a more complete how-to as you plan your transition to having more fun every day by walking and biking, check out Vélo Québec’s “ABC’s of Active Transportation“.

Top 15 Cycling Neighbourhoods In Canada

This article provides a brief survey of the top cycling neighbourhoods in Canada, based on four criteria: cycling mode share or the percent of people commuting by cycling; proximity to useful things – does the cycling network link origins and destinations that matter; cycling network quality – it’s connectedness, contiguity and safety; and finally, backup transportation – for those times when cycling just won’t work, what are the alternative means of transportation.

Of interest, the entry point to this list, the 15th ranked neighbourhood is Kitsilano with a cycle commuting mode share of 13.1%. The top ranked neighbourhood is Strathcona, also in Vancouver, with a massive 18.3% cycle commuting mode share.

Read the full article here.

Ontario Active School Travel – April Newsletter

The latest newsletter from Green Communities Canada on Active School Travel highlights funding for community projects, an updated website, and updates on bike to school week, a seminar on air pollution hazards around drop-off zones, and more. Check out the newsletter here, where you can also subscribe for updates.

70% Of Ontarians Now Live In A Bicycle Friendly Community

At the 10th Annual Ontario Bike Summit held last weekend Toronto, the Town of Caledon and the Town of Cobourg were awarded the Bicycle Friendly Community designation at the bronze level. This brings to 42 the number of Bicycle Friendly Community designated municipalities in the province. Fully 70% of Ontarians now live in a bike friendly community.

The City of Waterloo achieved gold status, becoming the first mid-size city in Ontario to do so and joining Toronto and Ottawa at that gold level.

There are now 3 gold, 8 silver, and 31 bronze designated Bicycle Friendly Communities in Ontario, evidence of the momentum underway to create a truly bicycle friendly province. These are the municipalities realizing the economic benefits of creating healthier, more desirable places to live, work, grow, and play.

Read more here.

Carpe Hibernum – Enjoying Canadian Winter

Looking for a way to enjoy the crisp blue skies and winter delights with friends and family in the great Canadian outdoors?

Then check out the Triangle Ski Club at their open house on Sunday December 10th. The Club offers a warm clubhouse and well-maintained trails from beginner to challenging for cross country skiing, snowshoeing and winter fatbiking.

For directions and details, see the website here.

The Health And Social Benefits Of Parks And Trails

The municipal leaders in this video understand the health and social benefits of parks and trails, as well as their direct contribution to economic development – attracting and retaining businesses, talent and families.

Do your councilors understand? Ask them!

See video here. 

Ottawa Valley Boosting Cycle Tourism

The Ottawa Valley region is one among many in Ontario tapping into the successful and growing cycle tourism sector. Their latest investment is route maps: “The cycling map can be used as a tool to draw cyclists from outside of the region to the area, which will support tourism in the area.”

Ask your favourite local/regional councilor why we’re not actively chasing this proven opportunity.

Read more here.

Moving Beyond Zero

A generation ago, Vision Zero was launched as a systems-based approach to reducing traffic harm. The vision is simple – zero fatalities. The means are more complex – recognizing that people make mistakes that cause harm, and designing roads and traffic environments that minimize risk when mistakes are made. Vision Zero has been adopted as policy in leading European countries and many N.A. cities.

Sweden is now “Moving Beyond Zero” on the principle that eliminating harm is good, yet encouraging healthier behaviours and lifestyles is even better.
http://movingbeyondzero.com/

People On Bikes Greatly Outnumber Cyclists

New parking-protected bike lane on Toronto’s Bloor St just prior to completion.

Matt Pender’s piece in The Star, talking about the success of Toronto’s Bloor St bicycle facilities, reminds us once again that when we build cycling facilities that serve the majority, we’re not serving the already-committed minority who would call themselves cyclists. Rather, we are targeting the nearly two-thirds of people who occasionally ride a bike and will eagerly do so more often when they feel safe. Indeed, designing for the “everyday cyclist” always results in a large uptake of cycling activity. The growth is entirely from the cohort of “people who ride a bike”. This busts the myth of the few remaining anti-laners who proclaim, “We don’t need bike lanes; there are no cyclists on the street.” The evidence is clear. Build it and people will ride. Read Matt’s article here.

Cycling Facilities That Serve The Majority

Much has been written about the need to design cycling facilities that serve the majority of people, those who are “interested yet concerned”. This cohort represents the majority, those who are quite willing to use a bicycle more often for everyday activities, yet are dissuaded by safety concerns. Designing to this cohort’s needs led to the adoption of protected lanes as the default wherever possible. And indeed, the largest uptakes in cycling activity occur with the implementation of protected lanes.

In Ontario, survey results have yielded the same outcomes and MTO has embedded the findings as part of their design guidelines in the Ontario Traffic Manual (OTM Book 18 – Cycling Facilities). Available here (large PDF download).

For those interested in the survey research, analysis and case studies underpinning all this see this article from Alta Planning + Design:
Understanding the ‘Four Types of Cyclists’”.

Maps For An Active Brockville

Heading out in Brockville and looking for a heritage walking tour, bike parking locations, park facilities or other features of our fine town? Well, the City’s growing collection of online maps may be just the thing you need.

Check out www.Brockville.com/maps for the full collection, in which you find useful gems like:

  • Outdoor Brockville – a photo and map tour that shows all of the spectacular green spaces accessible to everyone.
  • Heritage Tour – showing the locations and content of the over 50 heritage plaques around town.
  • City Explore – look for streets, addresses, and points of interest, with some aerial views.
  • Cycle Brockville – provides a map of the Brock Trail as well as all the bike parking locations in the downtown/waterfront area.
  • Downtown Brockville – a directory and locator map for the downtown area.

And lots more, so go and explore!

 

Bike Parking At Rib Fest And The Rails To Trails Festival

Bike parking area being set up for the Rails To Trails Festival.

Heading to Brockville’s waterfront this weekend? How about using your bike? Here’s how to do that. Whether you’re starting from in town or driving in with bikes and parking away from the downtown area, follow the Brock Trail (map here) right to the heart of the events. The Brock Trail provides an off-road family-friendly route.

After crossing the Tom Dailey Bridge behind the Mill Restaurant, in addition to all the bike racks and rings throughout the downtown area, you’ll find some large bike racks at the main Water Street entrance to Rib Fest, to which you can lock your bike.

Alternately, continue along Water Street to the Water Street parking lot where you’ll find bicycle parking under the big tent in the picture above. The tent will be staffed by volunteers from 8 to 8 on Saturday, and from 10 to 5 on Sunday, providing a supervised parking area.

Updated Brock Trail Map

Click to see full size, for downloading & printing.

Click on the map shown above to see a larger size picture which you can download and use. The map has been updated to show recently completed new segments as well as those currently under construction and soon to be finished, for example, the “401 bypass” route along central Ormond and Parkedale. Distances between waypoints, to the nearest 5 m, have also been added.

Carrying Tykes On Bikes

Alan and tyke on “curly bike”

“Average Joe Cyclist” published an article on his blog that is probably the best I’ve seen when it comes to summarizing how best to transport tykes on bikes. “This post shows how to choose between front-mounted bike seats for kids; rear-mounted bike seats for kids; bike trailers for kids; tag-along bikes for kids; tow bars for kids’ bikes; longtail cargo bikes for transporting kids; bucket-style cargo bikes; and electric bucket-style cargo bikes.” If you ever had any questions about the best approach for your particular situation, check out the article here.