Torontonians Overwhelmingly Support Cycling Facilities

“More than 80 per cent of Toronto residents support building protected bike lanes, a new poll finds. The support is highest among those living in the core, with nearly nine in 10 people in the former pre-amalgamation city of Toronto wanting the lanes. But the trend was also visible in the suburbs, including Scarborough, Etobicoke and North York, with more than 70 per cent of respondents expressing support in every region of the city, according to the survey results provided exclusively to CBC Toronto.”

“The random survey of 800 Toronto residents, conducted by Ekos Research Associates earlier this month, also found more than 75 per cent of people who primarily drive to get around the city are also supporters of protected bike lanes”

The survey results are incredibly positive and show even stronger support than surveys done over the last couple of years.

It’s finally sinking in. Despite labels like “pedestrians”, “cyclists”, and “drivers”, more understand that we’re all just people – friends, neighbours, family, all ages and all abilities – trying to move around safely regardless of choice of mode of transportation at any given time.

So let’s listen up and learn, and help each other get home safely.

Read the CBC article here: http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/toronto/bike-lane-poll-toronto-1.4766745

Vision Zero Successes In NYC

On Macombs Rd in the Bronx, redesign led to 41% fewer crashes with injuries. (Photo: NYC Dept of Transportation)

Large cities across North America are trying to come to grips with the rising tide of injuries and fatalities of vulnerable road users. In Toronto, from a health perspective, it can be described as an epidemic, worse than SARS.. New York City however stands as an example of steadily and successfully moving towards Vision Zero.  This past year, 2017, was the fourth consecutive year of declining traffic fatalities, with the fewest New Yorkers lost to traffic collisions since 1910.   As Haley Easto reports in an article from the Toronto Centre for Active Transportation, the lessons from New York City are clear and straightforward to adopt in Toronto or any other city.

Why does this matter to Brockville? Our City continues to struggle to become age friendly, youth friendly, walk friendly, and bicycle friendly, all components of an integrated set of lifestyle attractors as we compete to attract and retain talent, families, and new businesses. As a late starter and laggard in this competition we have the advantage of being able to observe and harvest the best practices from other places.
That includes Complete Streets and Vision Zero.

Read the article on lessons from NYC here.

 

Sudbury Joins The Complete Street Crowd

Cover image – Toronto Centre For Active Transportation

With Sudbury adopting a “complete streets” policy, residents join the 85% of Ontarians who live in a municipality where complete streets are either provincially mandated or have been adopted by local Council. As in other cities with a complete streets approach, public roads are designed and reconfigured to safely serve all members of the public – all ages, all abilities, all modes of transportation, for purpose or for pleasure.

Brockville is not a complete streets community – in fact it’s instructive to ask a candidate for Council if they know what a complete street is.
Read more about Sudbury here.
Learn more about complete streets here.